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Z-Line Gemini "L" Computer Desk - "Bow" Effect

Many people have reported the long wood section bowing downward. Is there a way to add an additional support under the desk without adding a center leg to keep it from bowing?

Howard Jones
Sat, 24 Jul 2010 03:14:37 +0000

I had the same problem, so I added oak boards underneath to support the desk. It eliminated the problem. I used a bigger oak strip in front and a smaller oak strip in the back; they are what I had on hand. I can see zero "bow" effect in the front. There is a slight "bow" in the back. So I'd say you'd want a bigger piece rather than a smaller one.

I used this same technique for bookshelves and shelves built-into the house.

You can also replace the entire desktop board with a big piece of oak board. That would probably do the same thing.

I haven't thought about the center leg. Thanks for mentioned it. It's nice to have more options. But I think the center leg would probably make the desk less practical.

Chieh Cheng
Sat, 24 Jul 2010 17:54:09 +0000

Can you give a little more info on how you added boards underneath to support the desk? I no handyman by any means, but would like to prevent the bow effect on this desk. Do you nail or screw it to the bottom, or is there something more involved?

Jason
Sun, 08 Aug 2010 19:35:52 +0000

I drilled through the reinforcement boards and the desk. Then I use washers, bolts, and nuts to fasten everything together. I used 1/4"-20 bolts and nuts. And 1-1/4" washers. Tonight, I'll shoot some photos and post them.

Chieh Cheng
Mon, 09 Aug 2010 13:43:03 +0000

Thanks, that would be very helpful!

Jason
Mon, 09 Aug 2010 20:43:08 +0000

The following is a photo of the top bolt and a very large washer. I used a large washer on top because the desk is made out of particle board. The large washer distributes the pressure over the surface and prevents the particle board from damage.

Also, because it's particle board, I ran the bolt through the surface. It took away part of the flat surface, but it will not wear down the particle board over time. If it's not done this way, the desk probably won't last very long.

Sometimes I've been know to over-improve like Tim Allen. But in this case, the desk will last for years!

Attached Image:

Top Bolt.JPG

Chieh Cheng
Mon, 16 Aug 2010 15:58:32 +0000

On the bottom, I attach an oak board strip. Oak board is very hard and strong. And you'll hear oak desks last a life time. The problem with oak desks is that they are extremely heavy. By using the a strip of oak board, you get the best of both world.

The bolt is a bit long. Rather than cutting the bolt with a hack saw. I used multiple washers and nut to make the bolt end flush. Most people will likely not perform this step. But I have little kids running around and I don't want the bolt end to cause forehead cuts.

Attached Image:

Bottom Nut.JPG

Chieh Cheng
Mon, 16 Aug 2010 16:01:31 +0000

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Title: reconfiguring the Z-Line Gemini "L" Computer Desk
Weblog: GearHack
Excerpt: Recently I needed a desk for my home office. I've always liked simple desks with four legs and no drawers. I just need a flat surface for my notebook computer. So I have been eyeing the Legacy Glass L-Desk at Staples. After studying this desk at the B&M store, I realized it could be taken apart to b . . .
Tracked: Sat, 24 Jul 2010 17:48:42 +0000

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